Moving London forward

 Moving London Forward

Moving London Forward

Currently, Crossrail is Europe’s most important infrastructure project. Over 40 specialists from Global Tunnelling Experts are part of the team building the western tunnels.

The new Crossrail railway link crossing through Britain's capital will have a total length of more than 100 kilometers. When operations start as scheduled in 2018, Crossrail will create a new and lastingly efficient railway route for up to 200 million passengers a year, running from Maidenhead and Heathrow in the west to Shenfield and Abbey Wood in the east.

Global Tunnelling Experts supports the BFK JV (BAM Nuttall Ltd., Ferrovial Agroman (UK) Ltd., Kier Construction Ltd.)  in London with the deployment of skilled personnel working on the western tunnels (C300/410). The lots comprise two 6.2m internal diameter bored tunnels, each 6.2km long between the Royal Oak portal, which is west of Paddington Station, and Farringdon Station. Also, the contract includes the shotcrete lining of the station tunnels and escalator tunnels at Bond Street and Tottenham Court Road as well as the Fisher Street cross-over tunnel, including ticket hall shaft construction at Tottenham Court Road. At times, up to 40 GTE specialists on more than a dozen job profiles, from EPB operators to welders and from fitters to yard electricians, assist the JV to move the project forward.

The running tunnels are being driven with two tailor-made Earth Pressure Balance Shields (EPB Shields, diameter 7,080mm) supplied by Herrenknecht. The giant 1,000-tonne tunnel boring machines (TBMs) are making their way between existing underground lines, sewers, utility tunnels and building foundations from station to station at depths of up to 36m. The TBMs driving the western tunnel, Phyllis and Ada, began tunnelling from Royal Oak in May 2012 and September 2012, respectively, towards Farringdon.

Contact for journalists:
Achim Kühn, Herrenknecht AG
Corporate Communications, Branding and Public Affairs
 

Jens Erik Ebbesen